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The NTC today released a proposed reform to reduce the amount of paperwork businesses that transport limited quantities of products classified as dangerous goods must complete.

Proposed red tape cut for businesses that move limited quantities of dangerous goods

26 November 2015

The NTC today released a proposed reform to reduce the amount of paperwork businesses that transport limited quantities of products classified as dangerous goods must complete.

Details of the proposed reform are contained in a regulatory impact statement that received in principle endorsement from the Transport and Infrastructure Council and is now available from the NTC’s website.

The NTC will consult with industry, regulators and emergency services organisations over the next 12 months with a view to agreeing on the specific details that will be included in the amendments to the Dangerous Goods Code. The NTC intends to recommend the council makes specific amendments to the code in November 2016.

Chief Executive of the NTC Paul Retter said the new policy could reduce red tape costs by up to $33 million per year, once implemented.

Businesses likely to see the benefits of these changes are those that transport limited quantities of retail products such as cosmetics and personal care products, household cleaning products, gardening and pest control products, and paint products.

“Australia needs laws to make sure dangerous goods are transported safely, but we also need to make sure we keep removing any unnecessary compliance burden on business,” Mr Retter said.

“After reviewing the evidence the NTC’s strongly believes we can keep Australia’s transport network safe while allowing businesses to go about their work more efficiently.

“The risk involved in transporting these kinds of products is very low. Transporters of these kinds of goods will still need to complete documentation on what types of materials they are carrying, but compared to current requirements the new documents will be much simpler and easier to understand by both businesses and regulators.”

The proposed reform includes implementing a common placard limit of two tonnes for all movements of limited quantities of goods classified as dangerous goods. The policy also proposes allowing retail packages containing a very small quantity of dangerous goods in a mixed package to be carried as general freight. 

Last Updated: 18/11/2016